Bungie seeks PayPal’s help to win lawsuit against AimJunkies


Bungie has decided to sue PayPal to obtain relevant documentation that could win it a lawsuit against AimJunkies involving copyright infringement.

Bungie seeks hope in PayPal: parties involved in the lawsuit

Bungie seeks help with PayPal documentation to win the case

Last summer, the company sued the other party accusing it of copyright and trademark infringement. 

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These are the parties involved:

  • AimJunkies, is a service that offers its users cheats and game strategies to gain strong advantages in some of the most popular video games on the market.
  • Bungie, on the other hand, is a US-based company dedicated to developing video games based in the city of Bellevue, Washington. Some of the company’s important projects have been: the Halo saga and Destiny.

Bungie’s lawsuit against AimJunkies now involves PayPal

Thus, the US company Bungie has taken legal action against AimJunkies, believing that the latter’s work infringes on the company’s copyright, harming all game developers.

Bungie’s lawsuit against AimJunkies is not the first among game developers and companies seeking to offer solution strategies to help users win more easily.

In recent years, a wave of lawsuits alleging copyright infringement has in fact targeted so-called “cheat” creators.

Several game companies, including Take-Two Interactive and Epic Games, have called some of these vendors to court. 

Notable lawsuits certainly include that of Elite Boss Tech, which agreed to pay $13.5 million in damages for copyright infringement.

Obviously, game developer Bungie is also determined to achieve a similar result in its legal battle against cheat seller AimJunkies. 

The company is suing PayPal 

Bungie sued AimJunkies last summer, accusing it of copyright and trademark infringement. 

AimJunkies’ defense centered mainly on the following arguments:

  • Cheating is not against the law;
  • The cheat software itself does not actually infringe copyright.

The federal court in Seattle, unexpectedly, largely agreed with AimJunkies’ line of defense, thus rejecting the corporate giant’s claims. 

However, Bungie was given the opportunity to file an amended complaint containing more details about the alleged irregularities.

The game developer then undertook this second legal opportunity in order to be able to win the case against the sued plaintiff.

For this reason, Bungie decided to sue PayPal, with the specific request to obtain all information regarding the identity of the customers who purchased the cheats. 

AimJunkies promptly responded by stating that the request is too broad and also outside the scope of the lawsuit. 

Bungie targets family members

Bungie’s request is beyond doubt strong and explicit. To limit its damage, Junkies immediately filed a motion for a protective order.

According to the defendant, the requested information, which includes sensitive private details as well as data about the wives and children of the individual defendants, goes too far and has nothing to do with the alleged scam activity that is at the heart of the lawsuit.

The defense, in fact, stated:

“It appears the goal of the subpoena is to identify Defendants’ customers as well. The identities of these customers has nothing to do with any legitimate issue in this case,” the defense writes.

Seeking the names and identities of Defendants’ customers is not only highly irrelevant, it appears intended to enable Bungie to harass Defendants’ customers by dragging them into this matter with ostensible ‘third party’ discovery”.

Thus, AimJunkies’ goal is to succeed in dismissing the case while avoiding the involvement and disclosure of data from indirectly involved defendants.

The court has not yet responded to AimJunkies’ request, but it is clear that both sides will do everything to achieve victory.





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